morganicalhy465

A great WordPress.com site

Month: November, 2013

Report: This Is the Best Look at Nokia’s Supercharged Lumia 929 Yet

Report: This Is the Best Look at Nokia's Supercharged Lumia 929 Yet

We’ve been hearing reports that Nokia will add the Lumia 929—a 5-inch 1080p device—to its growing fleet of phones with big screens sometime soon. Now Windows Phone Central has gotten its hands on images, which, if real, give us the best look at the phone so far.

Read more…

    



Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/KNe_LZR6fNU/report-this-is-the-best-look-at-nokias-supercharged-l-1458165556
Related Topics: Valerie Harper   ncis   james spader   Jack Nicholson   aaliyah  

Advertisements

Women under 60 with diabetes at much greater risk for heart disease

Women under 60 with diabetes at much greater risk for heart disease

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

31-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Patrick Smith
psmith88@jhmi.edu
410-955-8242
Johns Hopkins Medicine


Results of a Johns Hopkins study published today in the journal Diabetes Care found that young and middle-aged women with type 2 diabetes are at much greater risk of coronary artery disease than previously believed.

Generally, women under 60 are at far less risk for coronary artery disease than men of the same age. But among women of that age who have diabetes, their risk of heart disease increases by up to four times, making it roughly equal to men’s risk of this same form of heart disease.

“Our findings suggest that we need to work harder to prevent heart disease in women under 60 who have diabetes,” says Rita Rastogi Kalyani, M.D., M.H.S., endocrinologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and lead study author. “This study tells us that women of any age who have diabetes are at a high risk for coronary artery disease.”

While men generally have a higher incidence of heart disease than women, the study found that diabetes had little or no effect on men’s heart disease risk.
Kalyani said the new study is believed to be the first to focus specifically on gender differences in coronary artery disease among younger and middle-aged people with diabetes.

For the research, she and her colleagues analyzed data from more than 10,000 participants in three widely regarded studies: the GeneSTAR Research Program, the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III. None of the participants had a history of heart disease. All three studies yielded similar gender differences in rates of diabetes and the risk of developing heart disease.

“Our study adds to growing evidence that gender differences exist in the risk of coronary artery disease brought on by diabetes,” Kalyani says.

Interestingly, in both women and men, these findings were unrelated to differences in obesity and other traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking.

Kalyani and her colleagues offer several possible explanations for the increased risk. There may be distinct genetic and hormonal factors related to the development of heart disease by gender. Differences in adherence to heart-healthy lifestyle behaviors, compliance and treatment of cardiovascular treatments between genders are also possible but need to be further investigated, Kalyani says. Also, the relationship of diabetes duration and glucose control to risk of heart disease remains unclear.

###

In addition to Kalyani, the study’s authors are Mario Lazo, M.D.; Pamelo Ouyang, M.B.B.S.; Karinne Chevalier, M.S.; Frederick Brancati, M.D., M.H.S.; Diane Becker, Sc.D., M.P.H.; and Dhananjay Vaidya, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as well as Evrim Turkbey, M.D., of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center.



About Johns Hopkins Medicine


Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM), headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, is a $6.7 billion integrated global health enterprise and one of the leading academic health care systems in the United States. JHM unites physicians and scientists of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine with the organizations, health professionals and facilities of The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System. JHM’s vision, “Together, we will deliver the promise of medicine,” is supported by its mission to improve the health of the community and the world by setting the standard of excellence in medical education, research and clinical care. Diverse and inclusive, JHM educates medical students, scientists, health care professionals and the public; conducts biomedical research; and provides patient-centered medicine to prevent, diagnose and treat human illness. JHM operates six academic and community hospitals, four suburban health care and surgery centers, and more than 35 Johns Hopkins Community Physicians sites. The Johns Hopkins Hospital, opened in 1889, was ranked number one in the nation for 21 years in a row by U.S. News & World Report. For more information about Johns Hopkins Medicine, its research, education and clinical programs, and for the latest health, science and research news, visit http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org.



Media Contacts: Patrick Smith

410-955-8242; psmith88@jhmi.edu or

Helen Jones

410-502-9422; hjones49@jhmi.edu


[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Women under 60 with diabetes at much greater risk for heart disease

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

31-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Patrick Smith
psmith88@jhmi.edu
410-955-8242
Johns Hopkins Medicine


Results of a Johns Hopkins study published today in the journal Diabetes Care found that young and middle-aged women with type 2 diabetes are at much greater risk of coronary artery disease than previously believed.

Generally, women under 60 are at far less risk for coronary artery disease than men of the same age. But among women of that age who have diabetes, their risk of heart disease increases by up to four times, making it roughly equal to men’s risk of this same form of heart disease.

“Our findings suggest that we need to work harder to prevent heart disease in women under 60 who have diabetes,” says Rita Rastogi Kalyani, M.D., M.H.S., endocrinologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and lead study author. “This study tells us that women of any age who have diabetes are at a high risk for coronary artery disease.”

While men generally have a higher incidence of heart disease than women, the study found that diabetes had little or no effect on men’s heart disease risk.
Kalyani said the new study is believed to be the first to focus specifically on gender differences in coronary artery disease among younger and middle-aged people with diabetes.

For the research, she and her colleagues analyzed data from more than 10,000 participants in three widely regarded studies: the GeneSTAR Research Program, the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III. None of the participants had a history of heart disease. All three studies yielded similar gender differences in rates of diabetes and the risk of developing heart disease.

“Our study adds to growing evidence that gender differences exist in the risk of coronary artery disease brought on by diabetes,” Kalyani says.

Interestingly, in both women and men, these findings were unrelated to differences in obesity and other traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as high blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking.

Kalyani and her colleagues offer several possible explanations for the increased risk. There may be distinct genetic and hormonal factors related to the development of heart disease by gender. Differences in adherence to heart-healthy lifestyle behaviors, compliance and treatment of cardiovascular treatments between genders are also possible but need to be further investigated, Kalyani says. Also, the relationship of diabetes duration and glucose control to risk of heart disease remains unclear.

###

In addition to Kalyani, the study’s authors are Mario Lazo, M.D.; Pamelo Ouyang, M.B.B.S.; Karinne Chevalier, M.S.; Frederick Brancati, M.D., M.H.S.; Diane Becker, Sc.D., M.P.H.; and Dhananjay Vaidya, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, as well as Evrim Turkbey, M.D., of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center.



About Johns Hopkins Medicine


Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM), headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, is a $6.7 billion integrated global health enterprise and one of the leading academic health care systems in the United States. JHM unites physicians and scientists of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine with the organizations, health professionals and facilities of The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System. JHM’s vision, “Together, we will deliver the promise of medicine,” is supported by its mission to improve the health of the community and the world by setting the standard of excellence in medical education, research and clinical care. Diverse and inclusive, JHM educates medical students, scientists, health care professionals and the public; conducts biomedical research; and provides patient-centered medicine to prevent, diagnose and treat human illness. JHM operates six academic and community hospitals, four suburban health care and surgery centers, and more than 35 Johns Hopkins Community Physicians sites. The Johns Hopkins Hospital, opened in 1889, was ranked number one in the nation for 21 years in a row by U.S. News & World Report. For more information about Johns Hopkins Medicine, its research, education and clinical programs, and for the latest health, science and research news, visit http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org.



Media Contacts: Patrick Smith

410-955-8242; psmith88@jhmi.edu or

Helen Jones

410-502-9422; hjones49@jhmi.edu


[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

[

| E-mail


Share Share

]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/jhm-wu6103113.php
Related Topics: michigan football   lesean mccoy   rafael nadal   anthony weiner   Big Brother 15  

iPad Air reservations go live October 30 in Hong Kong and China

iPad Air reservations go live October 30 in Hong Kong and China

Much the same as before the iPhone 5s launch last month, Apple is taking reservations for the new iPad Air beginning October 30 in Hong Kong and China. According to listings on both Apple China and Apple Hong Kong, reservations will begin at 8am local time, for in-store pickup on launch day, November 1.

So far, there’s no word on any other iPad Air launch countries offering a similar facility. Indeed we’ve doubled checked the U.S. and the UK and neither are showing the same. It’s possible that pre-orders are being used once again to try and deter ‘scalpers,’ but eager buyers will still need to brave the lines just like everyone else. It’s just a shame we can’t all do it this way.

Source: Apple: China, Hong Kong

Thanks: Richard!

iPad Air

iPad Air
Apple’s full-sized iPad gets slimmed down. Features include:

Complete preview >

Released
November, 2013

Alternatives
Retina iPad mini, iPad 2

Replacements
iPad Air 2 (iPad 6)
Fall, 2014

Resources
Buyers guide
Help forum

    



Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheIphoneBlog/~3/IekAtHmGGdo/story01.htm
Tags: Most Receiving Yards In A Game   The White Queen  

NIH scientists develop candidate vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus

NIH scientists develop candidate vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

31-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Structure-based design may be key to successful vaccine for common childhood illness


An experimental vaccine to protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of illness and hospitalization among very young children, elicited high levels of RSV-specific antibodies when tested in animals, according to a report in the journal Science.


Early-stage human clinical trials of the candidate vaccine are planned. Scientists from the Vaccine Research Center (VRC), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, built on their previous findings about the structure of a critical viral protein to design the vaccine. The team was led by Peter D. Kwong, Ph.D., and Barney S. Graham, M.D., Ph.D.

In the United States, RSV infection is the most common cause of bronchiolitis (inflammation of small airways in the lungs) and pneumonia in children less than one year old and the most common cause for hospitalization in children under five. Worldwide, it is estimated that RSV is responsible for nearly 7 percent of deaths in babies aged 1 month to 1 year; only malaria kills more children in this age group. Others at risk for severe disease following RSV infection include adults over age 65 and those with compromised immune systems.

Many common diseases of childhood are now vaccine-preventable, but a vaccine against RSV infection has eluded us for decades, said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. This work marks a major step forward. Not only does the experimental vaccine developed by our scientists elicit strong RSV-neutralizing activity in animals, but, more broadly, this technique of using structural information to inform vaccine design is being applied to other viral diseases, including HIV/AIDS.

Earlier this year, the VRC team obtained atomic-level details of an RSV proteincalled the fusion (F) glycoproteinbound to a broadly neutralizing human RSV antibody. The protein-antibody complex gave scientists their first look at the F glycoprotein as it appears before it fuses with a human cell. In this pre-fusion shape, F glycoprotein contains a region vulnerable to attack by broadly neutralizing antibodies (antibodies able to block infection from the common strains of RSV).

Once RSV fuses with a cell, this vulnerable area, named antigenic site zero by the researchers, is no longer present on the rearranged F protein. In natural RSV infection, the immune system produces antibodies against both the pre-fusion and post-fusion forms of F glycoprotein, but the antibodies to antigenic site zero, which is only present on the pre-fusion form, have much stronger neutralizing activity. Therefore, a vaccine against RSV would have greater chance of success by eliciting antibodies directed at F glycoprotein in its pre-fusion configuration.

In their current publication, Drs. Kwong and Graham describe how they used this structural information to design and engineer F glycoprotein variants that retained antigenic site zero even when no antibody was bound to it. The goal was to create stable variants that could serve as the foundation for a vaccine capable of eliciting a potent antibody response. The researchers designed more than 100 variants; of these, 3 were shown by X-ray crystallography to retain the desired structure. The engineered variants were then used as vaccines in a series of experiments in mice and rhesus macaques.

In both mice and macaques, the researchers found that the more stable the protein, the higher the levels of neutralizing antibodies elicited by vaccination. The levels of antibody made in response to one of the engineered F glycoproteins were more than 10 times higher than those produced following vaccination with post-fusion F glycoprotein and well above levels needed to protect against RSV infection.

Here is a case in which information gained from structural biology has provided the insight needed to solve an immunological puzzle and apply the findings to address a real-world public health problem, said Dr. Graham. He and the VRC scientists are continuing to refine the engineered F glycoproteins and hope to launch early-stage human clinical trials of a candidate RSV vaccine as soon as clinical grade material can be manufactured, a process that takes about 18 to 24 months to complete.

Previously, structure-based vaccine design held promise at a conceptual level, said Dr. Kwong. This advance delivers on that promise and sets the stage for similar applications of structure-guided design to effective vaccines against other pathogens.

Dr. Fauci added, This latest advance underscores the advantages of the VRCs organizational design, where experts in RSV virology, vaccinology and clinical studies, such as Dr. Graham, are in daily contact with Dr. Kwong and others who are experts in structural biology. Such close collaboration across disciplines allows for rapid testing of new approaches to a given problem.

###

NIAID conducts and supports researchat NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwideto study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at http://www.niaid.nih.gov.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov.

NIH…Turning Discovery Into Health

References:
JS McLellan et al. Structure-based design of a fusion glycoprotein vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus. Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1243283 (2013).

JS McLellan et al. Structure of RSV fusion glycoprotein trimer bound to a prefusion-specific neutralizing antibody. Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1234914 (2013).


NIH scientists develop candidate vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

31-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Anne A. Oplinger
aoplinger@niaid.nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Structure-based design may be key to successful vaccine for common childhood illness


An experimental vaccine to protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of illness and hospitalization among very young children, elicited high levels of RSV-specific antibodies when tested in animals, according to a report in the journal Science.


Early-stage human clinical trials of the candidate vaccine are planned. Scientists from the Vaccine Research Center (VRC), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, built on their previous findings about the structure of a critical viral protein to design the vaccine. The team was led by Peter D. Kwong, Ph.D., and Barney S. Graham, M.D., Ph.D.

In the United States, RSV infection is the most common cause of bronchiolitis (inflammation of small airways in the lungs) and pneumonia in children less than one year old and the most common cause for hospitalization in children under five. Worldwide, it is estimated that RSV is responsible for nearly 7 percent of deaths in babies aged 1 month to 1 year; only malaria kills more children in this age group. Others at risk for severe disease following RSV infection include adults over age 65 and those with compromised immune systems.

Many common diseases of childhood are now vaccine-preventable, but a vaccine against RSV infection has eluded us for decades, said NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. This work marks a major step forward. Not only does the experimental vaccine developed by our scientists elicit strong RSV-neutralizing activity in animals, but, more broadly, this technique of using structural information to inform vaccine design is being applied to other viral diseases, including HIV/AIDS.

Earlier this year, the VRC team obtained atomic-level details of an RSV proteincalled the fusion (F) glycoproteinbound to a broadly neutralizing human RSV antibody. The protein-antibody complex gave scientists their first look at the F glycoprotein as it appears before it fuses with a human cell. In this pre-fusion shape, F glycoprotein contains a region vulnerable to attack by broadly neutralizing antibodies (antibodies able to block infection from the common strains of RSV).

Once RSV fuses with a cell, this vulnerable area, named antigenic site zero by the researchers, is no longer present on the rearranged F protein. In natural RSV infection, the immune system produces antibodies against both the pre-fusion and post-fusion forms of F glycoprotein, but the antibodies to antigenic site zero, which is only present on the pre-fusion form, have much stronger neutralizing activity. Therefore, a vaccine against RSV would have greater chance of success by eliciting antibodies directed at F glycoprotein in its pre-fusion configuration.

In their current publication, Drs. Kwong and Graham describe how they used this structural information to design and engineer F glycoprotein variants that retained antigenic site zero even when no antibody was bound to it. The goal was to create stable variants that could serve as the foundation for a vaccine capable of eliciting a potent antibody response. The researchers designed more than 100 variants; of these, 3 were shown by X-ray crystallography to retain the desired structure. The engineered variants were then used as vaccines in a series of experiments in mice and rhesus macaques.

In both mice and macaques, the researchers found that the more stable the protein, the higher the levels of neutralizing antibodies elicited by vaccination. The levels of antibody made in response to one of the engineered F glycoproteins were more than 10 times higher than those produced following vaccination with post-fusion F glycoprotein and well above levels needed to protect against RSV infection.

Here is a case in which information gained from structural biology has provided the insight needed to solve an immunological puzzle and apply the findings to address a real-world public health problem, said Dr. Graham. He and the VRC scientists are continuing to refine the engineered F glycoproteins and hope to launch early-stage human clinical trials of a candidate RSV vaccine as soon as clinical grade material can be manufactured, a process that takes about 18 to 24 months to complete.

Previously, structure-based vaccine design held promise at a conceptual level, said Dr. Kwong. This advance delivers on that promise and sets the stage for similar applications of structure-guided design to effective vaccines against other pathogens.

Dr. Fauci added, This latest advance underscores the advantages of the VRCs organizational design, where experts in RSV virology, vaccinology and clinical studies, such as Dr. Graham, are in daily contact with Dr. Kwong and others who are experts in structural biology. Such close collaboration across disciplines allows for rapid testing of new approaches to a given problem.

###

NIAID conducts and supports researchat NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwideto study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at http://www.niaid.nih.gov.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov.

NIH…Turning Discovery Into Health

References:
JS McLellan et al. Structure-based design of a fusion glycoprotein vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus. Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1243283 (2013).

JS McLellan et al. Structure of RSV fusion glycoprotein trimer bound to a prefusion-specific neutralizing antibody. Science DOI: 10.1126/science.1234914 (2013).


Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/nioa-nsd103013.php
Related Topics: jennette mccurdy   Arsenio Hall   Ariel Castro  

Bellator 106 Free Fight: Chandler vs. Alvarez I

This Saturday Bellator MMA lightweight champion Michael Chandler will rematch the very person he originally edged for the title, Eddie Alvarez. Before the two settle the score at Bellator 106, relive their epic “2011 Fight of the Year” from Bellator 58 and be sure to tune in to Spike TV Saturday night.

Source: http://mmafrenzy.com/95618/bellator-106-free-fight-chandler-vs-alvarez-1/
Category: emmy winners   harry potter   Wrecking Ball   Ichiro Suzuki   Erwin Schrödinger  

Google: Samsung Galaxy Nexus won’t get updated to Android 4.4 KitKat

Google Galaxy Nexus won't get updated to Android 44 KitKat

From the horse’s mouth, we’re hearing some unfortunate news: Google has taken to its Spanish support pages to announce that the Samsung Galaxy Nexus is not on the list of devices to receive Android 4.4 KitKat. This seems a bit odd, given the new update’s focus on “the next billion” and offering solid performance to other budget devices, but at the moment things aren’t looking up for owners of the phone — or any older Nexus devices, for that matter. We’ve reached out to Google for clarification on this and will update you if and when we hear back.

Google Samsung Galaxy Nexus won't get updated to Android 44 KitKat

Source: http://www.engadget.com/2013/10/31/google-galaxy-nexus-kitkat/?ncid=rss_truncated
Similar Articles: randall cobb   Baby Hope   tom brady   Alice Munro   area 51